Daily Archives: May 1, 2012

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crewmembers Aboard the International Space Station – Apply by July 2, 2012

NASA ARISS Program

Apply by July 2, 2012 to participate in HAM radio conversations with the ISS crew as part of the NASA ARISS program.

NASA is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between Nov. 1, 2012, and May 1, 2013. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, NASA is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due July 2, 2012.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. The technology is easier to acquire than ever before. ARISS has a network of mentors to help organizations obtain the technology required to host this once in a lifetime opportunity for students.

Interested parties should contact Teaching From Space, a NASA Education office, to obtain complete information including how the technology works, what is expected of the host organization and how to obtain the proposal/application form by sending an email to JSC-TFS-ARISS@mail.nasa.gov or by calling 281-244-1919.

Additional information can be found at http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/teachingfromspace/students/ariss.html.

NASA Earth Day Video Contest 2012 – Deadline May 31, 2012

The Earth from space

NASA's Earth Day Video Competition

To mark Earth Day 2012, NASA presents the Earth Day Video Contest 2012. For the second year in a row, NASA is challenging the public to create a compelling video vision of NASA’s exploration of Earth — The Home Frontier.

To enter, produce a short video that captures what you find inspiring and important about the unique view and understanding of Earth provided by NASA science. Upload your video to YouTube and tag it using the instructions found on the contest website. NASA will feature the best entry — chosen by a panel of NASA scientists and communicators — on the NASA website. And, the winner will receive a behind-the-scenes look at the next rocket launch of a NASA Earth-observing satellite.

Submissions will be accepted until May 31, 2012.

For more information, official contest rules and to see the winning video from last year, visit http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/earthday-vid-2012.html.

If you have any questions about this contest, please email Patrick Lynch at Patrick.Lynch@nasa.gov.

Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project – May 2012

The Aerospace Education Services Project is presenting a series of free webinars through May 2012. All webinars can be accessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Our Solar System: A Model Overview (Grades 4-9)
May 1, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will present NASA inquiry activities that demonstrate remote sensing and scale models to better visualize our sun, planets, asteroids and other objects as a whole system.

Mars Uncovered: Revealing the Geologic History of Mars (Grades 5-12)
May 2, 2012, 7:30 – 8:30 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Tony Leavitt will share an inquiry-based lesson that presents a critical-thinking approach of studying the surface of Mars. This process is similar to the approach used by NASA scientists. This lesson will teach students to examine geologic features of a planetary surface and use relative-age dating techniques to analyze the information and interpret the geologic history.

NASA and Education Resource Access (Grades K-12)
May 3, 2012, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Sonya Williams will explain NASA’s mission directorates and their purposes. Learn about the K-12 educational materials created by each of the directorates and how educators can access these materials free of charge. Learn about citizen science opportunities, student design challenges and many other NASA resources that educators can incorporate into their classrooms.

Animals in Space (Grades K-5)
May 3, 2012, 7 – 8 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Wil Robertson will demonstrate how teachers can use stuffed animals as props in telling the story of the animals that preceded humans in space. The program is geared for teachers in K-5 with a special focus of aligning the topic with the Core Literacy Standards for elementary grades. Web resources will be provided.

Animals in Space (Grades K-5)
May 5, 2012, 9 – 10 a.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Wil Robertson will demonstrate how teachers can use stuffed animals as props in telling the story of the animals that preceded humans in space. The program is geared for teachers in K-5 with a special focus of aligning the topic with the Core Literacy Standards for elementary grades. Web resources will be provided.

Food for Thought: Space Food and Nutrition in the Classroom (Grades 4-9)
May 5, 2012, 11 a.m. – noon EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will share “Food for Thought,” a new NASA educator guide designed to explore space food and the nutritional needs of astronauts that includes a menu of inquiry activities and other resources to address this exciting topic.

Rocket Scientists Write? (Grades K-12)
May 7, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist John Weis will demonstrate language arts activities using NASA materials and lessons found within NASA educator guides. Materials discussed will cover reading comprehension and composition for grades K-12. Lesson plans and strategies will be shared.

NASA’s S’COOL Program (Grades 4-12)
May 8, 2012, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Aerospace education specialist Les Gold will introduce NASA’s Students’ Cloud Observations On-Line, or S’COOL, program. The program engages students to make observations of cloud type and cover and then share it with NASA. Scientists use the data to assist their understanding of global climate change. After sending in observations, teachers receive satellite images for comparison to student data.

Free Planetarium Program for Your Computer (Grades K-12)
May 15, 2012, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Aerospace education specialist Les Gold will introduce participants to a free planetarium program. Participants will learn how to use the program to demonstrate day/night cycles, the sun’s changing position in the sky, as well as seasons, phases of the moon, constellations and more.

Looking at Our Earth From Above (Grades 4-9)
May 15, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m.
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will integrate science, technology, engineering, mathematics and geography, or STEM-G, with Earth observations, remote sensing and maps. NASA curriculum products, missions and other resources will be utilized to demonstrate an inquiry-based teaching strategy to better understand Earth and the processes that shape it.

Mars Uncovered: Revealing the Geologic History of Mars (Grades 5-12)
May 16, 2012, 7:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Aerospace education specialist Tony Leavitt will share an inquiry-based lesson that presents a critical-thinking approach of studying the surface of Mars. This process is similar to the approach used by NASA scientists. This lesson will teach students to examine geologic features of a planetary surface and use relative-age dating techniques to analyze the information and interpret the geologic history.

Rocket Scientists Write? (Grades K-12)
May 21, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist John Weis will demonstrate language arts activities using NASA materials and lessons found within NASA educator guides. Materials discussed will cover reading comprehension and composition for grades K-12. Lesson plans and strategies will be shared.

Toys in Space (Grades 4-9)
May 24, 2012, 7 – 8 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will share NASA’s Toys in Space videos and activities. In this program, astronauts took toys from around the world with them into space. Students predict, observe and record how the toys behave without the effects of Earth’s gravity, putting Newton’s Laws of Motion to the test. Participants will receive copies of the astronaut videos for use in the classroom.

Sun-Earth-Moon Relationships (Grades K-8)
May 24, 2012, 7 – 8 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Rick Varner will introduce sun-Earth-moon models that help to explain the phases of the moon and both lunar and solar eclipses. Additionally, the activity “Kinesthetic Astronomy” will be introduced for its explanation of the seasons.

For more information about these webinars, and to see a full list of webinars taking place through June 2012, visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Gwendolyn Wheatle at Gwendolyn.H.Wheatle@nasa.gov.

New DIY Podcast Module Available – Space Station

International Space Station

Now available - new NASA Do it Yourself Podcast module about the International Space Station

Are you looking for new ideas to integrate technology into your lessons? Or are you a student looking for a savvy idea for a class project? Then NASA’s Do-It-Yourself, or DIY, Podcast “Space Station” module may interest you.

Learn what astronaut Mike Fincke enjoys doing most while in space. Finke served as a flight engineer on the station as well as the commander for Expedition 18. He shares how extraordinary efforts of teamwork have resulted in the largest space structure ever built — the International Space Station, or ISS.

Ground-breaking research is being done on the space station by NASA and its international partners. Camille Alleyne, assistant program scientist for the International Space Station, shares some of the work being done in space and how it benefits us on Earth. And astronaut Garrett Reisman, flight engineer for Expeditions 16 and 17, takes us on a tour of the station.

So, why are you waiting? Choose from 40 video clips, 25 audio clips and a variety of images to learn about the station while having fun creating a podcast.

How DIY Podcast Works:
– Download NASA video and audio clips.
– Write a production script.
– Record your narration.
– Edit your product.
– Share your podcast.

Visit NASA’s DIY Podcast site at http://www.nasa.gov/education/diypodcast to learn more and to access information and resources for the new Space Station module.

ROSES-12 Amendment 4: Final Text for Appendix B.8, Heliophysics Data Environment Enhancements

This program solicits proposals designed to upgrade existing Heliophysics data products to improve the quality, utility, and accessibility of datasets relevant to Heliophysics research. Also solicited are proposals to continue existing data services, which would typically have a period of award no longer than two (2) years, featuring data from Heliophysics missions that have terminated or will soon terminate.

This amendment presents final text for Appendix B.8, Heliophysics Data Environment Enhancements (HDEE), which replaces the previous text in its entirety. Please Note: a call for Value Added Services, similar to that in previous HDEE calls, and for Virtual Observatories will be issued later this year as a separate call.

The due dates for HDEE have not changed. Notices of intent are due May 11, 2012 and proposals are due on July 20, 2012.

On or about April 18, 2012, this Amendment to the NASA Research Announcement “Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) 2012″ (NNH12ZDA001N) will be posted on the NASA research opportunity homepage at http://nspires.nasaprs.com/ and will appear on the RSS feed

at: http://nasascience.nasa.gov/researchers/sara/grant-solicitations/roses-2012.

Questions concerning Appendix B.8, HDEE, may be addressed to D. Aaron Roberts, Heliophysics Division, Code 672, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771. Email: aaron.roberts@nasa.gov Telephone: (301) 286-5606.

ESA Call for a Small Mission of Opportunity in ESA’s Science Program for a launch in 2017

- Request due to NASA by May 15
- NASA response to PI by June 1
- Proposal due to ESA by June 15
- Submission of full proposal and cover letter to NASA by June 22

The Call for Proposals from the European Space Agency (ESA) for a Small Mission of Opportunity in ESA’s Science program for a launch in 2017 is an ESA program planning activity ( http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=50119). NASA is not participating in the solicitation, but ESA program decisions that ultimately flow from the Call may provide cooperative opportunities that could advance progress toward NASA science goals.

It is anticipated that some U.S. investigators may wish to participate in the flight programs that will result from the advanced studies being solicited by the Call. NASA does not intend to commit itself to support U.S. participation in the ESA Small Mission program in advance of the proposal submission date. However, NASA is interested in the Small Mission program and the possibility of supporting U.S. investigator participation in future flight projects.

Per the Call, U.S. investigators collaborating on proposals to be submitted to ESA may provide ESA with a supporting letter from NASA. NASA is prepared to provide proposing U.S. investigators with a letter of acknowledgement for proposals in alignment with established NASA strategic science objectives. Proposers desiring such a letter must submit to NASA a brief description of (1) the mission concept contemplated, (2) the relevance of its science objectives to established NASA science objectives, and (3) contemplated U.S. involvement in the mission to be proposed. This description may not exceed 1000 words (approximately two single-spaced pages with 12-point type) and must be submitted by email no later than May 15, 2012, to colleen.hartman@nasa.gov. Requests for letters of acknowledgement should come from the lead U.S. collaborator on the proposed mission. NASA will conduct an internal review of the proposed mission’s relevancy to NASA science objectives and, for those submissions in good alignment with these objectives, will provide a letter of acknowledgement in time for submission to ESA with the proposal. NASA will provide a response to the PI by June 1, 2012.

Subsequently, U.S. proposers must submit, via NSPIRES, one copy of the full proposal, as submitted to ESA, no later than June 22, 2012, along with a cover letter from the U.S. lead collaborator. Instructions for electronic submission of these two documents through NSPIRES will be provided to proposers who request a letter of acknowledgement.

NASA science objectives are based on National Research Council decadal surveys and are described in the SMD Science Plan for 2010 ( http://science.nasa.gov/about-us/science-strategy/).

Potential investigators should note that the current NASA plan entails future consultations with ESA and may change. The present notice does not intend to state or imply any commitment to fund any future activity. This information is provided as a snapshot of present thinking to support advanced planning for U.S. participation in the Cosmic Visions program within the broader context of ESA’s Call and acquisition approach.

Address for 2-page descriptions by email (no later than May 15, 2012): colleen.hartman@nasa.gov

Any questions on NASA’s policy regarding the ESA Call for Proposals may be addressed to Dr. Colleen N. Hartman, Assistant Associate Administrator, Science Mission Directorate, NASA. Telephone: (202) 358-2165; E-mail: colleen.hartman@nasa.gov

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