Monthly Archives: December 2011

2011 in review – Many Thanks to Everyone

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Syndey Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 20,000 times in 2011. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 7 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

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2012 Climate Science Summer Workshops for Educators – Application Deadline June 1, 2012

The Institute for Earth Science Research and Education, in collaboration with Queens College/City University of New York, is seeking participants for summer professional development workshops in the second year of its Climate Science Research for Educators and Students project. Funded by the NASA Innovations in Climate Education program, this project seeks to improve student engagement in climate science by helping teachers and students develop authentic climate-related science research projects.

During summer 2012, two climate science workshops will take place in New York City. The first workshop will be held in late June or early July. The workshop will focus on understanding sun/Earth/atmosphere interactions and Earth’s radiative balance, a fundamental concept for climate science. All participants will build pyranometers, instruments for monitoring solar radiation. A follow-up workshop will take place in August. During the summer, participants are expected to conduct their own research.

All workshop participants in 2011 were from New York City or within commuting distance. In 2012, teachers from other places are encouraged to attend the early summer workshop, with follow-on activities to be conducted online in place of attendance at the August workshop. On-campus housing at Queens College should be available, and travel support for teachers from outside the NYC area may be available.

Applications are due June 1, 2012.

For more information, visit http://www.instesre.org/GCCE/GCCEHome.htm

Engineering Design: Forces and Motion – Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge Web Seminar Jan 5, 2012

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Jan. 5, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. This Web seminar will introduce the Forces and Motion: Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge for students. This activity provides first-hand information about density, neutral buoyancy and drag, which is then used to solve a problem. The activity provides many opportunities for incorporating national mathematics, science and technology learning standards into your curriculum.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar23.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Bring NASA Into Your Classroom With the NASA Explorer School Program

NASA Explorer Schools Program

Visit the NES website to learn about the free science materials, training, and support NASA offers to participating teachers.

Are you a teacher working with grades 4-12? Do you need better standards based Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) content for the classroom? Do you want free curriculum materials and the professional support to successfully implement those lessons and activities in the classroom? The NASA Explorer School (NES) program is for you!

The NASA Explorer Schools Program provides free lesson plans, activities, and professional development opportunities centered on NASA missions, careers, and STEM concepts. A searchable lesson library offers materials based around STEM topics and NASA research. NES offers free and engaging videos and live chats to directly involve students in a dialogue with NASA professionals. NES provides free live support for all educational materials and offers regular professional development opportunities for participating educators.

The NES program is a great way to find new STEM materials and the support to use them in your classroom. To find out more about the program and to submit a registration form, please visit the NASA Explorer School website at http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/index.html

ROSES-11 Amendment 37: Lunar Advanced Science and Exploration Research (LASER)

Amendment 37: Due Date delayed for Appendix C.8 Lunar Advanced Science and Exploration Research (LASER) Program.

The Lunar Advanced Science and Exploration Research (LASER) program supports a suite of lunar science investigations spanning the continuum from basic science to applied exploration science. Proposals having significant components of both basic and applied lunar science that further our understanding of the Moon and how to conduct science there are sought and highly encouraged.

This amendment delays the proposal due date for C.8 Lunar Advanced Science and Exploration Research (LASER) Program. This will better align the selection timeframe for LASER with the availability of new fiscal year funds.

The new due date for proposals been changed to March 1, 2012. Tables 2 and 3 of the Summary of Solicitation for this NRA have been updated to reflect this change.

On or about December 23, 2011, this Amendment to the NASA Research Announcement “Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) 2011” (NNH11ZDA001N) will be posted on the NASA research opportunity homepage at http://nspires.nasaprs.com/ (select “Solicitations” then “Open Solicitations” then “NNH11ZDA001N”). You can now track amendments, clarifications and corrections to ROSES and subscribe to an RSS feed at: http://nasascience.nasa.gov/researchers/sara/grant-solicitations/roses-2011

Questions concerning LASER may be addressed to Robert A. Fogel, Planetary Science Division, Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546-0001; Telephone: (202) 358-2289; Email: rfogel@nasa.gov

ROSES-11 Amendment 36: HyspIRI Preparatory Airborne Activities and Associated Science and Applications Research

This amendment provides the final text and proposal due date for A.26 HyspIRI Preparatory Airborne Activities and Associated Science and Applications Research.

NASA is developing concepts for a Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) mission. To support the development of the HyspIRI mission and prepare the community for HyspIRI-enabled science and applications research, NASA plans to fly the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER) instruments on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft, or comparable platform, to collect data sets in concert with other instruments for precursor science and applications research. This call is for proposals to use the HyspIRI-like airborne measurements resulting from the planned campaigns in FY2013 and FY2014 to address one or more science or applications research topics aligned with the science questions for the HyspIRI Mission, which are provided on the HyspIRI Mission Study web site at http://hyspiri.jpl.nasa.gov/science. A goal of this solicitation is to generate important science and applications research results that are uniquely enabled by HyspIRI-like data, taking advantage of the contiguous spectroscopic measurements of the AVIRIS, the full suite of MASTER TIR bands, or combinations of measurements from both instruments. Therefore, proposers are encouraged to submit proposals that utilize AVIRIS measurements, MASTER measurements, or both to address one or more of the HyspIRI science questions.

Notices of Intent to propose are due February 22, 2012, and proposals are due no later than March 21, 2012.

On or about December 23, 2011, this Amendment to the NASA Research Announcement “Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) 2011” (NNH11ZDA001N) will be posted on the NASA research opportunity homepage at http://nspires.nasaprs.com/ (select “Solicitations” then “Open Solicitations” then “NNH11ZDA001N”). You can now track amendments, clarifications, and corrections to ROSES-11 and subscribe to an RSS feed at: http://nasascience.nasa.gov/researchers/sara/grant-solicitations/roses-2011

The NASA HQ point of contact concerning this program element is Woody Turner, Earth Science Division, Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546-0001; Telephone: (202) 358-1662; Email: Woody.Turner@nasa.gov.

ROSES-11 Amendment 35: Strategic Astrophysics Technology

ROSES-11 Amendment 35: Revised text for Appendix D.8 Strategic Astrophysics Technology

Over the next decade and beyond, NASA’s Astrophysics Division expects to undertake a suite of space flight missions. Implementing them presents many daunting technological challenges. To overcome these challenges and pave the way to ever more ambitious missions, NASA’s Astrophysics Division is establishing the Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program to support the maturation of key technologies to the point at which they are feasible for implementation in space flight missions. The SAT Program is designed to support the maturation of technologies whose feasibility has already been demonstrated (i.e., TRL 3), to the point where they can be incorporated into NASA flight missions (TRL 6-7). Sometimes referred to as the “mid-TRL gap,” funding for such intermediate TRL development activities has historically been problematic because technologies in this regime are sufficiently mature that they are ill-suited to funding under basic research programs, yet still too immature for a mission to assume the risk of incorporating it into a flight system. Indeed, the problem of the mid-TRL gap was of such concern that it is specifically called out in the Astro2010 report, and an enhancement in funding specifically targeted at mid-TRL development is included among its Small Project recommendations. This is the role of the SAT program.

This amendment presents revised text for Appendix D.8 including new priorities for technology investment for Physics of the Cosmos Missions in in Section 3, and a new point of contact for Technology Development for the Cosmic Origins, in addition to many other small changes to the text. New text is in bold and deleted text is struckthrough.

The due date for Notices of Intent and proposals remain unchanged at January 27, 2012, and March 23, 2012, respectively.

On or about December 22 2011, this Amendment to the NASA Research Announcement “Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) 2011” (NNH11ZDA001N) will be posted on the NASA research opportunity homepage at http://nspires.nasaprs.com/ (select “Solicitations” then “Open Solicitations” then “NNH11ZDA001N”). You can now track amendments, clarifications, and corrections to ROSES and subscribe to an RSS feed at: http://nasascience.nasa.gov/researchers/sara/grant-solicitations/roses-2011

Further information about this amendment and the Laboratory Astrophysics section of the SAT program element is available from Douglas Hudgins, Astrophysics Division, Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546-0001; Telephone: (202) 358-0988; E-mail: Douglas.M.Hudgins@nasa.gov.

ROSES-11 Amendment 34: Computational Modeling Algorithms And Cyberinfrastructure

A.40, Computational Modeling Algorithms And Cyberinfrastructure (CMAC).

This amendment provides the final text and proposal due date for Appendix A.40, Computational Modeling Algorithms And Cyberinfrastructure (CMAC).

This program element provides research and development opportunities for new or improved computational modeling algorithms; the exploitation of new computing, storage, and networking architectures, the development of programming and analysis environment, interfaces between observational data and models; large scale observational input data and model output data management, and the adoption of rigorous software engineering standards, practice, and tools.

This program is also concerned about the interdisciplinary workforce development, especially at the interface between Earth, computing and computational sciences, and software engineering. Funding will be provided to develop an experimental summer education program to supplement the higher education programs at research universities. The intention is not to make environmental scientists experts in computational science or software engineering, but to increase the awareness and knowledge in these disciplines.

Notices of Intent to propose are due February 3, 2012, and proposals are due no later than March 9, 2012.

On or about December 19, 2011, this Amendment to the NASA Research Announcement “Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) 2011” (NNH11ZDA001N) will be posted on the NASA research opportunity homepage at http://nspires.nasaprs.com/ (select “Solicitations” then “Open Solicitations” then “NNH11ZDA001N”). You can now track amendments, clarifications, and corrections to ROSES-11 and subscribe to an RSS feed at: http://nasascience.nasa.gov/researchers/sara/grant-solicitations/roses-2011

The NASA HQ point of contact concerning this program element is Tsengdar Lee, Earth Science Division, Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546-0001; Telephone: (202) 358-0860; E-mail: tsengdar.j.lee@nasa.gov.

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