Category Archives: Engineering

NASA’s Sample Return Robot Challenge Competition Registration NOW OPEN

oo2013samplerobotRegistration is now open for teams wishing to compete in the $1.495 million robotics competition known as the Sample Return Robot Challenge, sponsored by NASA and managed by Worcester Polytechnic Institute of Worcester, MA. Registration for the competition will close on January 7, 2014 with late registration available until March 15, 2014. The competition will be held June 11-13, 2014.

For information about the Sample Return Robot Challenge rules, requirements, and how to register, visit:
http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={A282D064-383A-8906-2956-A6D67CE2964D}&path=open

“The objective of the competition is to encourage innovations in automatic navigation and robotic manipulator technologies that NASA could incorporate into future missions,” said Michael Gazarik, NASA’s associate administrator for space technology in Washington. “Innovations stemming from this challenge may improve NASA’s capability to explore an asteroid or Mars, and advance robotic technology for use in industries and applications here on Earth.”

To win, a team must demonstrate a fully autonomous robot that can seek out samples and return them to a designated point within a set time period. Robots will be required to navigate over unknown terrain, around obstacles, and in varied lighting conditions without human control, or use of GPS, or other terrestrial navigation aids.

This is a Centennial Challenge in which NASA provides the prize purse for technological achievements. The challenge is extended to individuals, groups and companies. Unlike most contracts or grants, awards will be made only after solutions are demonstrated successfully. Since the program’s inception in 2005, NASA’s Centennial Challenges has awarded more than $6 million to 15 different competition-winning teams through 24 events. Competitors have included private companies, citizen inventors and academia working outside the traditional aerospace industry.

The Sample Return Robot Challenge is part of the Centennial Challenges Program within NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA’s future missions. For more information about NASA’s investment in space technology, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech

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Sierra Nevada Corporation Dream Chaser Intern Positions

195_Dream_Chaser_Patch_CroppedChase Your Dreams: Join Sierra Nevada Corporation in creating the Next Generation Human Spacecraft!

Marketing and Engineering Opportunities available

Interns will work with a designated mentor or team to gain a thorough understanding of the career field of interest to include theory and practical application of obtained knowledge. The intern will benefit from mentoring, coaching, and side-by-side work with knowledgable and experienced experts in the field. The objective is real, hands-on work assignments related to intern’s major, providing them with skills vitally important in today’s business environment.

Those interested in employment following an internship will be considered based on current a openings, performance during internship, and proximity to graduation.

Primary Responsibilities Include:

  • Establishes learning objectives with mentor/supervisor
  • Supports assignments that represent general tasking in the field of interest
  • Occasionally takes on special projects as assigned by the mentor/supervisor
  • Establishes fundamental business/technical foundation through practice of internal processes and procedures
  • Job shadows at all levels in the field
  • Performs administrative functions as needed
  • Assists in the coordination and execution of company events
  • Punctuality to work each day and prepared to work scheduled work hours
  • Other duties as assigned

Learn more about specific opportunities and apply at http://careers.sncorp.com/career/index.asp

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Keeping the Wheels Turning: Registration open for the 20th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race

Moonbuggy LogoRegistration is now open for the 20th annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race, which challenges high school, college and university students around the world to build and race fast, lightweight “moonbuggies” of their own design.

The students’ work will culminate in two days of competitive racing April 26-27, 2013, at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala. NASA created the event two decades ago to complement classroom learning, provide young thinkers and builders with real-world engineering experience and inspire them to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics — the STEM fields.

“It’s our goal to keep the wheels turning,” said Tammy Rowan, manager of the Academic Affairs Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, which organizes the race each year. “The ingenuity and enthusiasm we see among racers begins in the classroom. That first spark of interest — whether it’s in basic chemistry or astronomy or the history of spaceflight — starts the wheels turning. The Great Moonbuggy Race helps sustain that momentum, turning interest into passion, and dreams into a lifelong pursuit of new answers and new horizons.”

International registration for the 2013 race closes Jan. 7. Registration for U.S. teams closes Feb. 4. Participating high schools, colleges and universities each may register up to two teams
and two vehicles. For complete rules and to register, visit: http://moonbuggy.msfc.nasa.gov

When Marshall created the race as a regional college challenge during the 1993-1994 school year, only eight teams participated. The high school division was added in 1996, and registration has swelled ever since.

Racers compete to post the fastest vehicle assembly and race times in their divisions, while incurring the fewest penalties. Prizes are awarded to the three teams in each division that finish with the lowest final times. NASA and industry sponsors present additional awards for engineering ingenuity, team spirit, best debut by a rookie team and more.

The course, built each spring on the outdoor grounds of the Space and Rocket Center, comprises a winding half-mile of gravel embankments, sand pits and obstacles that mimic the harsh surface of the moon. The race’s creators drew inspiration from conditions faced by the Apollo-era Lunar Roving Vehicles. Three rovers built at Marshall in the late 1960s were used on the moon during the Apollo 15, Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions in 1971 and 1972.

Today, the students’ moonbuggies address many of the same design challenges NASA and industry engineers overcame to deliver those historic rovers. The vehicles dramatically expanded astronauts’ reach across the lunar surface and enabled them to conduct much more scientific research during their brief stays on the moon.

In the most recent Great Moonbuggy Race, held in April 2012, more than 70 teams tackled the course. Petra Mercado High School in Humacao, Puerto Rico was first place in the high school division. The University of Alabama in Huntsville won first place in the college division. Petra Mercado, in only its second year in the competition, earned a completion time of 3 minutes and 20 seconds. The winning University of Alabama in Huntsville team finished in 4 minutes and 3 seconds.

To date, more than 5,000 students from around the world have participated in the races. Past winning teams have hailed from Alabama, Arizona, California, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah and Wyoming — and from Canada and Germany. International racers have come from as far away as India, Italy, Romania, Russia and the United Arab Emirates.

Racers from Erie High School in Erie, Kan., have held the record for the best course-completion time since 2008. Their best overall time of 3 minutes and 17 seconds earned the first-place trophy in the high school division that year.

More than 350,000 people watched live and archived coverage of the spring 2012 race on NASA TV and on UStream. For archived footage of the competition, visit:http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-msfc

For images and additional information about past races, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/moonbuggy

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Fourth Annual Lunabotics Mining Competition – Registration Ends at 50 Applications!

Registration Open for NASA’s Fourth Annual Lunabotics Mining Competition

NASA is challenging U.S. and international undergraduate and graduate student teams to design and build a telerobotic or autonomous excavator, called a Lunabot, that could be used on the moon. The Lunabot must be able to mine and deposit a minimum of 10 kilograms (22 pounds) of lunar simulant in 10 minutes. The scoring for the Mining Category requires teams to consider a number of design and operation factors such as dust tolerance and projection, communications, vehicle mass, energy/power required and autonomy.

Design teams must include one faculty advisor from a college or university and at least two undergraduate or graduate students. Universities may work in collaboration and multidisciplinary teams are encouraged. Selected teams will compete in the Lunabotics Mining Competition at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on May 20-24, 2013. Registration is limited to the first 50 approved teams. Registration is limited to one team per university campus. Internationally, registration is limited to 5 teams per country. Registration will end when NASA approves 50 applications.

The NASA EDGE video from NASA’s Third Annual Lunabotics Mining Competition is available at: http://www.nasa.gov/mp4/670179main_NE00072112_39_Lunabotics_2012.mp4

For more information and to apply online, visit NASA’s Lunabotics Mining Competition on the Web at http://www.nasa.gov/lunabotics.

ROSES-12 Amendment 9: Airborne Instrument Technology Transition (AITT)

ROSES-12 Amendment 9: Final text for Appendix A.29, Airborne Instrument Technology Transition (AITT).

AITT seeks to upgrade mature instruments developed under NASA’s Instrument Incubator Program, or by similar NASA programs or activities, for operation from various platforms supported by the Airborne Science Program. This opportunity provides for engineering activities leading to the integration of instruments to airborne platforms that will deploy them as part of organized airborne science campaigns which typically involve multiple instruments and/or platforms. The goal is to upgrade existing operating instruments to campaign-ready airborne configuration(s). No funding is available for research and development of new instrumentation.

Proposals submitted to this announcement shall support the objectives of one or more of the Earth science Focus Areas. Earth science focus areas include: Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems, Climate Variability and Change, Water and Energy Cycle, Atmospheric Composition; Weather, and, Earth Surface and Interior (see Appendix A.1 for descriptions of the focus areas). Relevance to these focus areas is indicated by the degree to which instrument products (i.e. science and engineering data) support the goals and activities of existing and future field campaigns sponsored by the NASA Research and Analysis program; it may also be demonstrated by relevance to the goals and activities of NASA’s Applied Science Program. Examples of previous field campaigns can be found at the Airborne Science Website.

This Amendment presents the final text of Appendix A.29, AITT, which replaces the draft version in its entirety. Notices of Intent to propose are requested by July 23, 2012. Proposals are due on September 24, 2012.

On or about June 26, 2012, this Amendment to the NASA Research Announcement Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) 2012 (NNH12ZDA001N) will be posted on the NASA research opportunity home page at http://nspires.nasaprs.com/ and will appear on the RSS feed at: http://nasascience.nasa.gov/researchers/sara/grant-solicitations/roses-2012 .

Questions concerning the Airborne Science Program may be addressed to Randy Albertson, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, P.O. Box 273, Edwards, CA 93523-0273. Telephone: (661) 276-7540; Email: Randal.T.Albertson (at) nasa.gov

For Earth Science Technology information contact Eduardo Torres-Martinez, Code 407, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771. Telephone: (301) 286-7166; email: Eduardo.Torres-Martinez-1 (at) nasa.gov

NASA point of contact for programmatic questions regarding this solicitation is Jared Entin, Earth Science Division, Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546-0001. Email: Jared.K.Entin (at) nasa.gov; Telephone: 202-358-0275.

Fourth Annual Space Grant Faculty Senior Design Training Faculty Workshop – July 19-20, 2012

NASA Human Exploration and Operations Higher Education Project in partnership with the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program Presents the Fourth Annual Space Grant Faculty Senior Design Faculty Training Workshop

NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations is hosting a free 2-day faculty workshop in the summer of 2012, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. The purpose of this workshop is to prepare higher education faculty to implement the following Exploration senior engineering design course with a strong focus on the NASA systems engineering process:

“Hybrid Rocket Experiment Station for Capstone Design” by Dr. Edgar Conley with New Mexico State University

The course meets the quality standards of an ABET-accredited program and implements the NASA systems engineering process. All NASA engineering projects utilize this process; therefore, the course will help prepare students to work for NASA and space industry partners.

Workshop Dates: July 19 & 20, 2012
Workshop Times: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Registration Deadline: July 9, 2012 by 5:00 p.m. EDT

The workshop is open to U.S. citizens only. Travel reimbursements available on a first come first served basis.
http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/ESMDWorkshop.html

Discovery Channel Seeking America’s Top Inventors, Machinists, and Engineers to Compete for a Huge Grand Prize! – Apply by March 7, 2012

Discovery Channel Top Engineer Casting Call

Apply by March 7, 2012 to participate in the Discovery Channel's new show, Top Engineer!


(this just in from Pilgrim Studios!)

Are you a designer who can build? Are you a machinist who can design?

The Discovery Channel is looking for America’s most creative and daring techies, machinists, inventors, and engineers to design, build, and BLAST their way to a grand prize on a new competition TV show called TOP ENGINEER.

A handful of lucky men and women will be chosen to take on exciting challenges from various engineering filed a the state-of-the-art WET Design facilities in California (http://www.wetdesign.com).

No, you don’t need to have an engineering degree to compete on this show, but you MUST be able to design, build, test, and integrate an idea into a final product that WORKS. These will be fast-paced, hands-on, VISCERAL challenges! If your experience is strictly behind the keyboard, then this show is NOT for you.

We are looking for visual effects experts, accomplished home shop machinists, contractors, and engineers with backgrounds in electrical, civil, structural, or mechanical engineering.

If you have an outgoing personality and are ready to get your hands dirty for the chance to win a grand prize and the title of TOP ENGINEER, then we want to hear from you.

APPLY TODAY! Deadline March 7, 2012

email topengineercasting@gmail.com with your name, age, location, phone number, a recent photo and a brief explanation of why you are perfect for this competition show.

Deadline to submit is MARCH 7. 2012. Applicants must be US citizens or residents at least 21 years of age. For more information, please visit http://www.pilgrimstudios.com/casting/topengineer

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NASA – NASA Seeks Game Changing Technology Payloads for Suborbital Research Flights

NASA – NASA Seeks Game Changing Technology Payloads for Suborbital Research Flights.

NASA’s Game Changing Opportunities research announcement seeks proposals for payloads, vehicle enhancements and onboard facilities for payload integration that will help the agency advance technology development in the areas of exploration, space operations and other innovative technology areas relevant to NASA’s missions. Sponsored by NASA’s Space Technology Program, the agency expects proposals from entrepreneurs, scientists, technologists, instrument builders, research managers, and vehicle builders and operators.

Proposals will be accepted from U.S. or non-U.S. organizations including NASA centers and other government agencies, federally funded research and development centers, educational institutions, industry and nonprofit organizations.

NASA expects to make approximately 20 awards this summer, with the majority of awards ranging between approximately $50,000 and $125,000 each. Several awards may be made for up to $500,000 in the area of vehicle integration and payload engineering technology enhancements and onboard research facilities to improve platform capabilities.

Read more about the call for proposals at NASA NSPIRES website: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7b66840A2F-0937-3BD2-9811-5F4FC1B2830A%7d&path=open

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